Stop Waiting for SEO Heroes and Make Great Stuff

I have six professional heroes presently – and I don’t mind sharing. In random order, they are:

Seth Godin – For telling me to quit dead ends and focus on being the best.
Edward Tufte – Guided me into information design, recognizing and avoiding chartjunk, and telling stories visually.
Jakob Nielson – For telling it like it is even when it’s totally unpopular.
Richard Florida – For drawing attention to what drives creative people.
Steve Wozniak – For his approachable demeanor as well as the desire to spread knowledge.
Steve Jobs – For his relentless passion to innovate.

I’ve met Florida, Tufte, Jobs and Wozniak. If only for a moment (they wouldn’t remember me.) I had no trouble making the list above. It came to me in 3 minutes. Each have contributed through a career of hard work with a real passion to improve things.

Have any heroes emerged in the SEO world? Should we expect it? As I sat in a meeting recently all eyes were on me to save the business. My answers about content creation, social media, and slow, steady growth were not superhero answers. Some are looking for the cape crusader to save old-school companies with new marketing feats of awe. People start looking for a mild-mannered SEO to burst from the phone booth and fix the problem. I don’t know why.

“SEO Building Permits” – An SEO’s Presence Throughout A Design Project can Prevent Expensive Tear-Outs

We can draw a parallel between SEO advice and building permitting. Pressures placed on any web development project can cause marketing goals to be conveniently ignored, just like marketing goals, building codes and standards. Paid search ends up the beneficiary when an “un-optimizable” site results.

Voters Seek Neutral Ground for Learning about Candidates – Skip Candidate Websites

With increased Internet use and widespread broadband connectivity, the shift from old to new media is influencing the way people participate in elections, according to a recent report by the Pew Internet & American Life Project. Not since John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon debated in front of 70 million new television watchers in 1960 have we seen such a change in political media. A wave of changes brought on by Web sites, blogs and social media is being led by the 18- to 30-year-old demographic and is spreading to reach Americans of all ages and backgrounds.